Archive for the ‘ Dr. Ann Chuang ’ Category



March 9, 2022
Tips and Tricks for a Great Night’s Sleep

National Sleep Awareness Week is March 13th through 19th. Sleep health is an important topic that is often overlooked. When you don’t get enough sleep your mental and physical health can suffer immensely. Here are some tips and tricks from our surgeons to ensure you get the best sleep possible!

Establish a sleep routine. “Go to bed the same time each night and get up the same time each morning,” says Dr. Anjeanette Brown, “Getting 7-8 hours of sleep per night is a good rule of thumb.” Irregular sleep patterns can affect your circadian rhythm and your melatonin levels, which signal your brain to sleep.

Adjust your environment if needed. Sleep in a dark, quiet, comfortable environment. If your room is too bright, consider getting black out curtains or wearing a sleep mask. If your house or apartment is noisy, consider getting a white-noise machine or fan that can help soothe you and block out any external noise. Make sure your room is not too hot and not too cold; around 68-70 degrees Fahrenheit is best for sleeping. If comfort is your issue, try out different pillows or mattresses that address your specific needs.

Wind down as needed. Be sure to limit the use of electronics before bed. “It’s best to ditch electronics at least one hour before bedtime,” says Dr. Ann Chuang. Blue light restricts the production of melatonin, the hormone that controls your circadian rhythm. “Be sure to relax before bedtime. Trying a warm bath and reading might help,” says Dr. Brown.

Avoid alcohol and caffeine. Caffeine and other stimulants like nicotine should be avoided, especially later in the day. Alcohol also reduces the amount of REM sleep you get at night, which helps you make and retain memories.

Make physical activity a priority. Exercising regularly can promote better sleep. It is important to make sure you don’t exercise too close to bedtime, though, as that can have an opposite effect.

Reduce daytime naps. If you’re someone who naps regularly, it can be negatively affecting the sleep you get at night. Try to limit daytime naps and when you feel the need to take one, keep it to around 30 minutes.

 

This week and every week, make sleeping better a top priority! If you are experiencing ongoing difficulty sleeping, please be sure to consult your physician to rule out any sleep disorders.

 

Resources:

https://www.thensf.org/sleep-awareness-week/

 

November 9, 2021
National Family Health History Day

November 25th, which is Thanksgiving Day this year, is also National Family Health History Day. Knowing your family health history is very important and allows you to take the proactive measures needed for your personal health. When it come to breast health, this is especially true when it comes to any genetic mutations. Our surgeons implore you on this day and every day, to become more aware of your family history and educate yourself on preventative measures should you have a family history of breast cancer.

You can help your doctor decide on the best screening and genetic testing protocol by supplying an accurate family health history. Breast Cancer is an example of how this is true. If a woman carries the Breast Cancer gene, not only does she have a markedly increased risk of developing breast cancer in her lifetime, but she can pass this gene, with its associated risks to her children. 

A woman with a first-degree female relative with breast cancer (Sister, mother, daughter) has double the lifetime risk of developing breast cancer.  If 2 first-degree relatives have been diagnosed with breast cancer, that woman’s risk is 5 times higher than the average woman.  With family health history knowledge, proper screening and testing can be implemented. Cancer prevented is even better than cancer cured! 

Family health history can allow other types of cancer and potentially life-threatening diseases to be prevented or detected early and cured. Communicate with your family about your family health history, it is knowledge that is very important to your or your children’s future health. 

-Dr. James Frost, MD

 

Genetics plays a strong role in everything.  It can determine everything from hair color to health.  As a physician, it is important for my patients to know their family’s health history.  It is like a map so we know what you are more prone to and can intervene, so you won’t develop what your family members have.  Family history helps us calculate and personalize medicine, treatment, and care.  Help us help you by knowing your family’s health history.

-Dr. Ann Chuang, MD

 

It is very important to know your family health history. In my case, my mother’s mother (maternal grandmother) and my mother’s aunt (maternal great-aunt and sister to my grandmother) both were diagnosed and treated for breast cancer in their late 60s. My maternal great aunt also had a GIST tumor which can also be genetic in transmission. On my father’s side, there is a cousin (my father’s second oldest sister’s daughter) who had breast cancer in her mid-40s. There is no other family history of breast cancer on my father’s side. My father’s eldest sister died of complications from liver cancer- possible Hepatitis from prior blood transfusions in the 1970s.

There is also hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease on my mother’s side of the family (maternal grandmother); there is no other significant family history that I am aware of at this time.
It is so important to know both the mother and the father’s family health history, as both sides play a part in your own health surveillance.  The information that I provide to my doctors from the family history helps them guide my care.

-Dr. Anjeanette Brown, MD

 

Knowing your family history is very important because it can sometimes reveal patterns of diseases that may be putting you at risk for disease.  It is important to know not only your family’s cancer history but also other diseases, like heart or lung disease and diabetes.  Older generations can sometimes be reluctant to discuss their medical history as they feel it is private information.  They should be encouraged to share their history because it may offer the progeny the ability to prevent diseases.  When it comes to cancer diagnoses it is important to know at what age your family member was diagnosed. For example, if your mother was diagnosed with breast or colon cancer under the age of 50, it will mean that you need to start getting your screening mammograms or colonoscopies earlier than the general population.  Currently we know about many different genes that can lead to cancers, so if you have a pattern of cancer types, or many people in your family with cancer, you may be a candidate for genetic testing.  If you feel that you may be a candidate for genetic testing, it is important to discuss that with your doctor or see a genetic counselor who will go through your family tree and recommend appropriate testing, and then go over those results with you to understand your risk.

-Dr. Desiree D’Angelo, DO

 

 

To learn more about genetic testing and counseling we offer, please  call us at 844-973-0002 or visit: https://www.premiersurgicalnetwork.com/breast-cancer-genetic-testing/

 

June 1, 2021
Breast Cancer in Men: What You Need to Know
When you think of breast cancer, what comes to mind? Many people picture women, sometimes wearing pink, or a pink ribbon. Although breast cancer very commonly seen in women, men can also develop breast cancer and it’s important to raise awareness and support men breast cancer thrivers or survivors as well. The following are key facts about breast cancer in men: The ratio of male-to-female breast cancer diagnoses is 1 man to every 120 women. Male breast cancer rates are… Read More
June 1, 2021
June is National Hernia Awareness Month
Hernias are extremely common, affecting millions of Americans each year. However, only a portion of those suffering from hernias actually seek treatment. National Hernia Awareness Month aims to raise awareness about hernias and the effective treatment options that are available. Dr. Desiree D’Angelo and Dr. Ann Chuang, answered some frequently asked questions about hernias and discuss their responses in the below video. What is a hernia? A hernia is known as “a hole in the wall.” It occurs when there… Read More
September 2, 2020
Lifestyle Modifications for Breast Cancer Prevention
Breast Cancer is something that has affected so many people and impacted our lives in some way or another. As with many cancers, there are several risk factors besides family history that impact this disease. On the topic of Health & Fitness Day, Dr. Ann Chuang details the correlation of breast cancer and living a healthy lifestyle. 1 out of 8 women will develop breast cancer in their lifetime.  Most of these women do not have a family history of… Read More
May 15, 2020
How to Make your Health a Priority during National Women’s Health Week
National Women’s Health Week begins on Mother’s Day every year to remind women to take care of themselves and to make their health a priority, especially this year with the COVID-19 pandemic. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has several recommendations including getting the suggested screenings and preventative care, which may be delayed due to the pandemic. As health care providers, we hope that we will be able to resume breast cancer screenings as soon as possible. If… Read More